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8:06pm July 27, 2014
realaaroura:

myfriendscallmemaury:

uberfaenatic:

starkinglyhandsome:

cloudyobsession:

yourlocalpsychopath:

randomthingieshere:

abbysrwk:

paradoxsocks:

merlinsbearditsthedoctor:

gallifreyanprincess:

merlinsbearditsthedoctor:

pizzaforpresident:

why are people even questioning obesity in america

why is your tea liquidised?

….. Where exactly do you live that the tea isn’t liquid?!?

ENGLAND. WHERE IT IS IN A BAG AND YOU MAKE IT YOURSELF.

like what do you do with already liquid tea? Microwave it?

No it’s sweet tea you drink it cold

WHO DRINKS COLD TEA???

HAVE YOU NEVER HAD ICED/SWEET TEA BEFORE?!?

so i reblogged this from a british person and i’ve been laughing at their tags for 600 years





England, you stole tea from China.  You’ve had it a mere 4 centuries compared to their 30+.  Don’t play like you’re some kind of authority.

[skeletons ooh-ing]

Shots fired. World War Tea has officially begun.

#INTO THE HARBOR

Well that’s longer than you’ve been a country

realaaroura:

myfriendscallmemaury:

uberfaenatic:

starkinglyhandsome:

cloudyobsession:

yourlocalpsychopath:

randomthingieshere:

abbysrwk:

paradoxsocks:

merlinsbearditsthedoctor:

gallifreyanprincess:

merlinsbearditsthedoctor:

pizzaforpresident:

why are people even questioning obesity in america

why is your tea liquidised?

….. Where exactly do you live that the tea isn’t liquid?!?

ENGLAND. WHERE IT IS IN A BAG AND YOU MAKE IT YOURSELF.

image

like what do you do with already liquid tea? Microwave it?

No it’s sweet tea you drink it cold

WHO DRINKS COLD TEA???

HAVE YOU NEVER HAD ICED/SWEET TEA BEFORE?!?

so i reblogged this from a british person and i’ve been laughing at their tags for 600 years

image

image

image

image

England, you stole tea from China.  You’ve had it a mere 4 centuries compared to their 30+.  Don’t play like you’re some kind of authority.

[skeletons ooh-ing]

Shots fired. World War Tea has officially begun.

Well that’s longer than you’ve been a country

8:03pm July 27, 2014

words-of-emotion:

I’m scared that you’ll leave that’s why I’m so insecure and worried and fearful for that day to come when you get tired of me

8:02pm July 27, 2014

thefaggots0far:

It only takes being rejected once for me to never ever ask anyone anything ever again.

8:01pm July 27, 2014
newsweek:

Perhaps because we’re bombarded on all sides by animal cuteness, there’s something appealing about a book called “Animal Madness.” Enough with all the cuddling, you might think; it’s time for the real story, which Laurel Braitman, a historian of science with a Ph.D. from M.I.T., aims to tell.
Where the BuzzFeed Animals page, for example, urges us to see animals as an undifferentiated mass of squee-worthy fluff, Braitman wants us to take animals seriously—to see them as individuals with life histories and psychologies as dramatic and intense as our own.
Despite the winsome book design (there’s an adorably sad dog on the cover, and drawings of a glum raccoon and gorilla on the inside), there’s nothing remotely cute about this goal. “Animal Madness” is so upsetting, in fact, that I wanted to stop reading it about halfway through.
It’s obvious, of course, that animals of all sorts suffer from physical pain. It’s also obvious that many animals can be tense, unhappy, anxious, enraged, compulsive, impulsive, sad, depressed, and so on.
Still, it’s tempting for many people, even sympathetic ones, to put those words in scare quotes—to see animal “depression” or “anxiety” as a less intense or consequential version of their human equivalents. Braitman pushes back against that tendency. She has an absolute, not a comparative, sense of the animal soul.
What matters isn’t how much an animal’s mental life is “worth,” compared to a person’s, but how wholly and powerfully it is illuminated by happiness or darkened by anguish. “Every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose hold of it from time to time,” she writes. An animal’s life can be changed utterly by mental illness, just like a person’s.
A gorilla that sees her family killed, and that is kidnapped and brought to a zoo to live out her life on display, may have her whole existence reshaped by trauma, loneliness, and fear. Why argue about how intelligent she is? The point is that her life has been knocked off course and that she is suffering; she is no longer the animal she was.
Laurel Braitman’s “Animal Madness”

newsweek:

Perhaps because we’re bombarded on all sides by animal cuteness, there’s something appealing about a book called “Animal Madness.” Enough with all the cuddling, you might think; it’s time for the real story, which Laurel Braitman, a historian of science with a Ph.D. from M.I.T., aims to tell.

Where the BuzzFeed Animals page, for example, urges us to see animals as an undifferentiated mass of squee-worthy fluff, Braitman wants us to take animals seriously—to see them as individuals with life histories and psychologies as dramatic and intense as our own.

Despite the winsome book design (there’s an adorably sad dog on the cover, and drawings of a glum raccoon and gorilla on the inside), there’s nothing remotely cute about this goal. “Animal Madness” is so upsetting, in fact, that I wanted to stop reading it about halfway through.

It’s obvious, of course, that animals of all sorts suffer from physical pain. It’s also obvious that many animals can be tense, unhappy, anxious, enraged, compulsive, impulsive, sad, depressed, and so on.

Still, it’s tempting for many people, even sympathetic ones, to put those words in scare quotes—to see animal “depression” or “anxiety” as a less intense or consequential version of their human equivalents. Braitman pushes back against that tendency. She has an absolute, not a comparative, sense of the animal soul.

What matters isn’t how much an animal’s mental life is “worth,” compared to a person’s, but how wholly and powerfully it is illuminated by happiness or darkened by anguish. “Every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose hold of it from time to time,” she writes. An animal’s life can be changed utterly by mental illness, just like a person’s.

A gorilla that sees her family killed, and that is kidnapped and brought to a zoo to live out her life on display, may have her whole existence reshaped by trauma, loneliness, and fear. Why argue about how intelligent she is? The point is that her life has been knocked off course and that she is suffering; she is no longer the animal she was.

Laurel Braitman’s “Animal Madness”

7:58pm July 27, 2014
abigaillarson:

laughcentre:

oceanmaster:



THIS IS THE CUTEST MOTHER FUCKING THING ON THIS SITE I WANT TO CRY

Having a bad day? NOT ANYMORE.

abigaillarson:

laughcentre:

oceanmaster:

image

THIS IS THE CUTEST MOTHER FUCKING THING ON THIS SITE I WANT TO CRY

Having a bad day? NOT ANYMORE.
7:51pm July 27, 2014
7:50pm July 27, 2014

crocspaperscissors:

godheadcomplex:

godheadcomplex:

apparently my college campus is getting burrito vending machines???

image

why

someone has pointed out to me that the burrito box comes with free wifi

now im interested

did a burrito vending machine not interest you????

7:50pm July 27, 2014

swornswans:

bralpha:

bralpha:

so yesterday i got home from my best friend’s birthday party and thirty seconds later my sister comes into my room and asks me if i can keep a secret and i said it depends and she pulled a fucking cat out from behind her back and i was like “i think we can keep this between us”

image

his name is peanut and hes this country’s most precious secret 

well now 171 people know about this you had one job

Make that 135,193 people. Who are on record.

7:48pm July 27, 2014
7:48pm July 27, 2014